The Future Could Well Be Orange

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The clever bit of these iconic designs is the production process which enabled both glazed and matt finishes to be produced on the same pot.  Each of these Hornsea Pottery pieces has had the pattern screen printed onto the surface with specially developed ink designed to withstand high temperatures.   After the pattern was printed the pots were dipped into tubs of glaze. The ink used to create the patterns contained oils and waxes which the glaze ran off. Simple. This technique combined with the limited palette of contrasting colours, created the Hornsea signature relief pattern and look.

Hornsea pottery is a great thing to collect.  It was mass produced, so readily available after being stored in the back of grandma’s cupboard and it’s cheap and hard wearing enough to be used every day.

As the classic Bush TR230 was first produced in 1971, it could be the perfect radio to add to your Seventies set.  If it’s John Clappison’s pottery that brings a smile to your face, the simple shape and styling of this little transistor would fit in perfectly and, what’s more, set against Saffron or Heirloom pottery, this radio is just the right shade of orange.  Are you ready for the Seventies revival?

 

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